COURSE INFORMATION
Epidemiology

 
 
 

EPI200 Principles of Epidemiology
Fall 1
Dr. J. Buring

2.5 credits
Lectures, seminars. Two 1-hour sessions and one 2-hour seminar each week.

Introduces the basic principles and methods of epidemiology. Lectures are complemented by seminars devoted to exercises or to the discussion of current examples of epidemiologic studies.
Course Activities: Class discussion, seminar participation, quiz, final examination.
Course Note: Credit is not given for more than one of EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI 208.


EPI200 Principles of Epidemiology
Summer 1
Dr. A. Hofman

2.5 credits
Lectures, seminars. Five 2-hour sessions each week.

This course will provide an orientation to epidemiology as a basic science for public health and clinical medicine. It will address the principles of the quantitative approach to clinical and public health problems. The course will discuss measures of frequency and association, introduce the design and validity of epidemiologic research, and give an overview of data analysis. This course is an introduction to the skills needed by public health professionals to interpret critically the epidemiologic literature. It will provide students with the principles and practical experience needed to initiate the development of these skills. Lectures are complemented by seminars devoted to case studies, exercises, or critique of current examples of epidemiologic studies.
Course Activities: Class discussion, seminar, quiz, final exam.
Course Note: This course is taught during Session I of the Summer Institute for Public Health Studies in Quantitative Methods; credit is not given for more than one of EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI 208.


EPI201 Introduction to Epidemiology
Fall 1
Dr. F. Cook

2.5 credits
Lectures, seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each week, one 2-hour seminar each week.

This course covers the principles and methods used in epidemiologic research. It is an alternative to EPI 200 and is designed for students majoring in Epidemiology or Biostatistics, or for students who desire a more detailed introduction into the main issues encountered in the design, implementation, and analysis of epidemiologic studies. This course is designed to complement EPI202 to provide students with an integrated full-semester training in epidemiology.
Course Note: Credit is not given for more than one of EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI 208.


EPI202 Elements of Epidemiologic Research
Fall 2
Dr. M. Mittleman

2.5 credits
Lectures, seminars. Two 2-hour sessions and one 2-hour seminar each week.

Introduces elements of study design, data analysis and inference in epidemiologic research. Principles and methods are illustrated with examples, and reviewed through homework and in-class exercises. May serve as an introduction to more advanced study or as a concluding course for those desiring a working knowledge of epidemiologic methods.
Course Note: EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI208 required - concurrent enrollment permitted; BIO 200; or BIO 200s and BIO 200t; or BIO 201 or BIO 202 and 203; or BIO 205; or BIO 219; or BIO 206 and BIO 207, BIO 208 or BIO 209 required - concurrent enrollment permitted. There are multiple labs for this course - student should select section with lab time which best matches their course schedule.


EPI202 Elements of Epidemiologic Research
Summer 2
Dr. M. Mittleman

2.5 credits
Lectures, seminars. Five 2-hour sessions each week.

Introduces elements of study design, data analysis and inference in epidemiologic research. Principles and methods are illustrated with examples, and reviewed through homework and in-class exercises. May serve as an introduction to more advanced study or as a concluding course for those desiring a working knowledge of epidemiologic methods.
Course Note: EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI208 required - concurrent enrollment permitted; BIO 200; or BIO 200s and BIO 200t ; or BIO 201; or BIO 202 and 203; or BIO 205; or BIO 219; or BIO 206 and BIO 207, BIO 208 or BIO 209 required - concurrent enrollment permitted.


EPI203 Design of Case-Control and Cohort Studies
Spring 1
Dr. C. Hsieh

2.5 credits
Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

Beginning with the randomized clinical trial as a paradigm, this course examines common problems in the design, analysis, and interpretation of observational studies. Cohort and case-control studies are the focus of the discussion, but not to the exclusion of other designs. Problems of exposure and disease definitions, time-dependent effects, confounding, and misclassification are considered in the light of data sources typically available. Relevant statistical methods are introduced but not developed in detail.
Course Activities: Review of published studies, written group projects, class discussion.
Course Note: EPI 202 or EPI 202t and BIO 200 BIO 201, or BIO 200s and BIO 200t or signature of instructor required.


EPI204 Analysis of Case-Control and Cohort Studies
Spring 2
Dr. D. Spiegelman

2.5 credits
Lectures, laboratories (optional). Two 2-hour sessions each week.

Examine, through practical examples, common modeling issues in multivariate regression analyis for etiologic studies. Explore analytic approaches in the presence of missing data, confounding, interaction, and collinearity. Emphasize analysis and interpretation of results in the context of research question and study design.
Course Activities: Written group projects, class discussion, short quiz, homework.
Course Note: EPI 203 required; BIO210 required, can be taken concurrently.


EPI205 Practice of Epidemiology
Fall
Dr. M. Stampfer, Dr. N. Meuller

2.5 credits
Seminars, tutorials. One 2-hour tutorial each week during Fall 1period and one 2-hour seminar each week during Fall 2 period.

The seminars consist of student presentations of plans for collection and analysis of epidemiological data, with discussion by students and faculty. Preparatory work is done under tutorial arrangements with members of the faculty. The emphasis is on conceptual issues necessary for the development of a fundable epidemiological study.
Course Activities: Individual student paper and presentation, student and faculty critiques.
Course Note: This course is aimed at epidemiology doctoral students; background in epidemiology is required; signature of instructor required.


EPI207 Advanced Epidemiologic Methods
Fall 1
Dr. J. Robins, Dr. M. Hernan

2.5 credits
Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions and one 2-hour lab each week.

Provides an in-depth investigation of statistical methods for drawing causal inferences from observational studies. Informal epidemiologic concepts such as confounding, selection bias, overall effects, direct effects, and intermediate variables will be formally defined within the context of a counterfactual causal model and with the help of causal diagrams. Methods for the analysis of the causal effects of time-varying exposures in the presence of time dependent covariates that are simultaneously confounders and intermediate variables will be emphasized. These methods include g-computation algorithm estimators, inverse probability weighted estimators of marginal structural models, g-estimation of structural nested models. As a practicum, students will reanalyze data sets using the above methods.
Course Activities: Class discussion, homework, practicum and final examination.
Course Note: EPI204 and, BIO210, or BIO233, or signature of instructor required; familiarity with logistic regression and survival analysis is expected; lab time will be announced at first meeting.


EPI208 Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology
Summer
Dr. D. Singer, Dr. E. F. Cook

5 credits
Lectures, seminars, case studies. Five 2-hour sessions each week.

This course is an introductory-level course and covers the principles and methods used in traditional and clinical epidemiologic research through a series of lectures, exercises, seminars, workshops and presentations. This course is targeted at individuals planning to conduct clinical research.
Course Activities: Written assignments, computer exercises, seminar discussion; each student is required to develop a study proposal that addresses a specific clinical problem and to present this proposal to the class. Seminars are held during scheduled class time.
Course Note: For participants in the Summer Program in Clinical Effectiveness only; no auditors.


EPI212 Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Diseases
Fall 1
Dr. E. Rimm, Guest Lecturers

1.25 credits
Lectures. One 2-hour session each week.

Reviews the epidemiology of the chronic cardiovascular diseases. Demographic distribution and time trends of these diseases are presented, and known risk factors are discussed. The course is open to all students. Course Activities: Grades are based on short papers and written paper critiques.


EPI213 Epidemiology of Cancer
Spring 1
Dr. S. Hankinson, Dr. E. Giovannucci

2.5 credits
Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

Reviews basic concepts and issues central to cancer epidemiology. Considers the descriptive epidemiology of cancer and discusses the implications of the biology of cancer for identification of risk factors. Examines the role of smoking, radiation, nutrition, and other exposures. Selected malignancies are discussed.
Course Activities: Each student prepares a review of the epidemiology of a specific cancer site.
Course Note: EPI 250 or signature of instructor required.

EPI216 Epidemiology in Public Health Practice
Spring 2
Dr. R. Dicker

2.5 credits
Case studies. One 3-hour session each week.

The course uses case studies to teach the principles and practice of field epidemiology, ranging from surveillance to descriptive epidemiology to outbreak investigation to analytic methods. The course focuses on the use of sound epidemiologic judgment, particularly when epidemiologic theory and practical considerations conflict. Following this course, the student will be familiar with the principles of epidemiology relevant to public health professionals, and should be able to apply those principles to address public health problems in the community.
Course Note: EPI 200a, EPI 201, or EPI 208 required.


EPI217 The Epidemiology of Adult Psychiatric Disorders
Fall 1
Dr. P. Wang, Dr. M. Tsuang

2.5 credits
Lectures. One 3-hour session each week.

Covers a range of studies from early classics to recent work on the occurrence and distribution of psychiatric illness. Describes the application of basic epidemiologic research designs to the study of psychiatric conditions. Clinical aspects of psychopathology will also be introduced. The course is an introductory course in the psychiatric epidemiology track. It is intended for master's degree and doctoral students interested in mental health research and those who desire a general introduction to the field of psychiatric epidemiology.
Course Activities: Class discussion, final examination, homework assignment.
Course Note: Background in introductory statistics and understanding of basic epidemiologic research methods recommended; EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI 208 and BIO 200, BIO 201 or BIO 200s and BIO 200t recommended (concurrent enrollment permitted) or permission of instructor.


EPI219 Assessment Concepts and Methods in Psychiatric Epidemiology
Fall 2
Dr. D. Blacker

2.5 credits
Lectures, laboratory/practice sessions. One 2-hour lecture and one 1-hour laboratory/practice session each week.

Presents the application of basic epidemiologic and psychometric concepts and methods in psychiatric research. Topics include: measurement theory, reliability, validity, screening, and diagnostic classification procedures, as they specifically relate to psychiatric research. The course is in the psychiatric epidemiology track and is intended primarily for students interested in conducting mental health research.
Course Activities: Class discussion, brief homeworks, class project with oral presentation and final paper.
Course Note: Students should be familiar with the major forms of psychopathology, basic epidemiologic research methods, and introductory statistics; EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI 208 and BIO 200 or BIO 201 or BIO 200s and BIO 200t required or consent of instructor; lab or section time to be announced at first meeting.


EPI220 Psychiatric Diagnosis in Clinic and Community Populations
Spring 2
Dr. J. Murphy, Dr. M. Tsuang

2.5 credits
To be given 2002-2003; offered alternate years.
Lectures, seminars, outside practicum involving interviews. One 2-hour session each week, in addition to practicum work.

Focuses on interview schedules designed to diagnose psychiatric disorders in clinical settings and household surveys. Provides practical experience in differential diagnosis, in the administration of different kinds of interview schedules, and in analysis of responses. The course is designed primarily for students considering a career in mental health research. The course is an applied, mid-level course in the psychiatric epidemiology track.
Course Activities: Class discussion, verbal and written reports on practicum experience.
Course Note: Students should have an understanding of the major forms of psychopathology; basic epidemiologic research methods and introductory statistics; EPI 217 or EPI 218 and EPI 219; signature of instructor required; no auditors.


EPI221 Pharmacoepidemiology
WinterSession
Dr. A. Walker

2.5 credits
Lectures. Four 2-hour sessions each week.

Within the framework of formal epidemiologic analysis, this course covers inference about the effects of pharmaceuticals from case reports, case series, vital statistics and other registration schemes, cohort studies, and case-control studies. Decision-making with inadequate data is examined from the perspectives of manufacturers and of regulators. Students are graded on the basis of group projects. This course is intended primarily for students wishing to pursue a career in the pharmaceutical industry or in national regulatory bodies, but may have more general interest as an applied mid-level course with a heavy methodological emphasis.
Course Activities: Written and oral group projects, individual class presentations, class discussion.
Course Note: Knowledge of epidemiology at the level of EPI 202 and a basic understanding of drug use and nomenclature are assumed; completion of EPI203 preferred; enrollment limited to 25 students; signature of instructor required.


EPI222 Genetic Epidemiology of Diabetes and its Complications
Spring 2
Dr. F. Hu, Dr. J. Warram

2.5 credits
Offered 2002-2003; taught alternate years.
Seminar, case studies, laboratories. One 2-hour session and one 2-hour laboratory session each week.

The genetics of diabetes and its complications, together with the descriptive epidemiology of these conditions, will be used to illustrate the process of generating etiologic hypotheses that can be studied by the methods of genetic epidemiology. Techniques of molecular genetics relevant to epidemiologic studies will be reviewed and demonstrated. Data sets that include genotype information will be analyzed with an emphasis placed on the examination of various gene/environment interaction.
Course Note: EPI 202 required; lab or section time to be announced at first meeting; ordinal grading option only.


EPI224 Cancer Prevention
Fall 1
Dr. G. Colditz

2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies, laboratories. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

Approaches to cancer prevention will be reviewed with the principal emphasis on primary prevention. After a brief discussion of issues in the application of screening and the contribution that screening for each cancer, one by one, can make through early diagnosis, we will focus on the social and behavioral changes that can achieve the same or greater
reduction in cancer incidences. This course will review models for prevention, and emphasize the timing of prevention in the context of the natural history of disease etiology (examples discussed in detail will include breast and colon cancer). The importance of population-wide strategies rather than high risk approaches will be emphasized. Levels of intervention from action by health care providers (e.g., counseling and screening), regulatory policy, social structural changes to individual behavior changes will be emphasized. Key components necessary for prevention policy include an adequate knowledge base, social strategies, and political will. These must be in balance. Students will develop a cancer prevention intervention.
Course Note: Requirement for students in the Cancer Education Program.


EPI225 Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases
Spring 1
Dr. M. Murray

2.5 credits
Lectures, seminars, case studies. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

This course covers the basic concepts of infectious disease dynamics within human populations. Focus will be on transmission of infectious agents and the effect of biological, ecological, social, political, economic forces on the spread of infections. We will emphasize the impact of vaccination programs and other interventions. The dynamics of host-parasite interaction are illustrated using basic mathematical modeling techniques.
Course activities: written homework assignments and final exam. Previous coursework in epidemiology helpful.


EPI228 Oral Epidemiology
Fall
Dr. C. Douglass, Dr. K. Joshipura, C. Hayes, E. Peters

2.5 credits
Not to be given 2002-2003; offered alternate years.
Lectures, seminars, case studies. One 2-hour session each week.

This course will first discuss the principal measures and methods of epidemiology as they apply to oral conditions; then the distribution, etiology and risk factors for dental caries, periodontal diseases, cleft lip and palate, oral cancer, soft tissue lesions and malocclusions will be studied. The third part of the course links oral epidemiology data to health policy issues:e.g. community preventive dentistry programs, national health care policy, infection control, and health services outcome research.
Course Activities: Class discussion, reading homework, written assignments, midterm and final examinations.
Course Note: EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI 208 required (concurrent enrollment permitted).


EPI229 Ophthalmic Epidemiology
Spring 1
Dr. J. Seddon, Guest Lecturers

1.25 credits
Not to be given 2001-2002; offered alternate years.
Lectures, seminars, discussion. One 2-hour session each week.

This course reviews the epidemiology of leading causes of blindness, including cataract, macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. Results from various epidemiologic study designs are considered, with focus on issues relevant to ophthalmic research.
Course Note: EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI 208 preferred.


EPI235 Health Services Epidemiology
Spring 2
Dr. S. Schneeweiss (P), Dr. M. Maclure (S) and guest lecturers

2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. Two 2-hour lectures each week.

This course is designed to introduce Epidemiology students to the application of standard epidemiologic methods to Health Services Research. The course helps students to recognize the principles of Epidemiology in Health Services Research, and understand the terminology and methods specific to the field. Threats to validity including selection bias, confounding, information bias, and methods for their control will be discussed in a variety of settings emphasizing practical considerations. Lectures include recent or ongoing case studies and examples from the literature. Topics include strategic planning, quality management, risk-adjustment, benchmarking, outcomes and effectiveness research, and program evaluation.
Course Note: EPI202 and BIO 200 or BIO201 required or signature of instructor.


EPI236 Analytical Aspects of Clinical Epidemiology
Summer 1
Dr. E. F. Cook

5 credits
Lectures, seminars. Ten 2-hour sessions each week.

This course examines some features of study design, but is primarily focused on analytic issues encountered in clinical research. These include techniques for stratified analysis, regression modeling, matching and recursive partitioning. Emphasis is placed on the use of these techniques for the control of confounding and the development of clinical prediction rules. The focus of this course is on applications and interpretations of results with limited introduction to theory that underlies these techniques.
Course Activities: Seminars are scheduled during regular class time. Students must develop a written summary of the analysis of a clinical data set based on the results of daily computer exercises.
Course Note: EPI 208 and BIO 206 and BIO 207 or BIO 208 (or similar courses) required; signature of instructor required.


EPI238 Predictive Modeling and Data Mining
WinterSession
Dr. E.F. Cook, Dr. N. Cook

1.25 credits
Lecture, computer lab. Five 2-hour lectures each week and 10 2-hour computer labs each week.

This course will present an introduction to the methods of data mining, with particular emphasis on applications to analyses of genetic data. Basic concepts and philosophy of data mining as wel as appopriate applications will be discussed. Topics covered will include multiple comparisons adjustment, and predictive model building through logistic regression, classification and regression trees (CART), multivariate adaptive splines (MARS), and neural networks.
Course Activities: Computer labs.
Coure Note: Students should be familiar with logistic regression (EPI236, BIO213, BIO210, or equivalent); signature of instructor required; no auditors.


EPI240 Use of Biomarkers in Epidemiologic Research
Spring 2
Dr. S. Stuver, Dr. S. Hankinson

1.25 credits
Not to be given 2002-2003; offered alternate years.
Lectures, case studies. One 2-hour session each week.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of the issues pertinent to the collection, measurement, and statistical analysis of biomarker data. The course aims to address general principles within the context of relevant examples. Topics to be covered include study-design considerations, sample storage, sources of laboratory variability, assay evolution, use of pooled samples, and repeated measures analysis, among others.
Course Activities: Class discussion, final project.
Course Note: EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI 208 required; minimum enrollment of 10 students required.


EPI241 Measuring Health Status
Fall
Dr. E. F. Cook

2.5 credits
Lectures. One 2-hour session each week.

Examines methodologic issues related to measures of health status encountered in clinical research. Topics to be covered include instrument development, scaling,assessment of reliability, validity and responsiveness to change; principal component analysis and factor analysis; item response theory
Course Activities: Working in groups students must design an instrument to measure a construct of choice, distribute that instrument to a population, analyze the performance of the instrument from that data and present their results in class.
Course Note: Minimum enrollment of 10 students required.


EPI242 Seminar in Applied Research in Clinical Epidemiology
Fall
Dr. D. Singer, Dr. E. F. Cook, Dr. E. J. Orav

1.25 credits for Fall semester; 1.25 credits for Spring semester
Seminars. One 1.5-hour session each week.

This seminar serves as a forum for students' clinical epidemiologic research. In the process, students are exposed to a variety of research designs, analytic strategies, and content areas There is active class discussion. Faculty emphasize methodologic issues pertinent to that presentation.
Course Activities: Student presentation or written assignment.
Course Note: Must register in each appropriate semester; separate grade given at the end of each semester; signature of instructor required.


EPI242 Seminar in Applied Research in Clinical Epidemiology
Spring
Dr. D. Singer, Dr. E. F. Cook, Dr. E. J. Orav

1.25 credits for Fall semester; 1.25 credits for Spring semester
Seminars. One 1.5-hour session each week.

This seminar serves as a forum for students' clinical epidemiologic research. In the process, students are exposed to a variety of research designs, analytic strategies, and content areas There is active class discussion. Faculty emphasize methodologic issues pertinent to that presentation.
Course Activities: Student presentation or written assignment.
Course Note: Must register in each appropriate semester; separate grade given at the end of each semester; signature of instructor required.


EPI244 Genetic Epidemiologic Methods for Psychiatric & Other Disorders
Spring 1
Dr. S. Santangelo, Dr. P. Van Eerdewegh, Dr. M. Tsuang

2.5 credits
To be given 2002-2003; offered alternate years.
Lectures, Labs. One 3-hour session and one lab.

Designed to introduce students to classical and current research methodology for genetic epidemiologic studies of complex (non-Mendelian)
disorders using examples drawn from the psychiatric genetics literature. Topics include issues in phenotype definition, design and analysis of
family, twin, and adoption studies, segregation analysis, linkage analysis methods, and association studies. Students will gain direct
experience in carrying out linkage analyses using different approaches and analytic packages. Laboratory sessions will be devoted to discussion
of the technical details of executing the relevant computer programs and interpretation of results. This is one of the courses on the psychiatric
epidemiology track, but it may also be of interest to students wanting to learn methods for studying any disorders with complex genetic
inheritance.
Course Activities: Lectures, class discussion, homework assignments, labs devoted to computer analyses of data, interpretation, oral or written
presentation of results of data analyses.
Course Note: Students should have an understanding of basic epidemiologic research methods, introductory biostatistics and probability; BIO227
or signature of instructor required; enrollment limited to 25 students.


EPI247 Epidemiologic Methods Development - Past and Present
Fall 2
Dr. M. Mittleman

2.5 credits
Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

This course aims to provide students with a strong foundation in understanding the theoretical basis of currently used epidemiologic methods and also to help students acquire an understanding of the process of developing new approaches. The course will review the theoretical basis of modern epidemiology by reviewing landmark papers in the development of epidemiologic methods. Students will review classic papers that introduced important theoretical and methodological advances in the field.
Course Note: EPI 204 or signature of instructor required.


EPI249 Molecular Biology for Epidemiologists
Fall 1
Dr. I. De Vivo

2.5 credits
Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

This course offers an overview of molecular biology and presents molecular biological concepts and techniques commonly used in the laboratory and in epidemiological research. Topics include the structure of DNA and genes, DNA replication, transcription and RNA translation.
Course notes: Enrollment limited to 30 students; signature of instructor required; no auditors.


EPI250 Molecular Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases
Fall 2
Dr. D. Hunter

1.25 credits
Lectures, seminars, case studies. One 2-hour session each week.

This course is an introductory overview of the molecular genetics and epidemiology of chronic diseases, with emphasis on use of new laboratory techniques in epidemiologic studies. Also discussed will be the application of epidemiologic methods to the generation of new etiologic hypotheses.
Course Note: EPI 200a, EPI 201 or EPI 208 or signature of instructor required.


EPI251 Studies in Molecular Epidemiology
Spring 1
Dr. D. Hunter

1.25 credits
Not offered 2002-2003.
Seminars, case studies. One 2-hour session each week.

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with recent developments in molecular epidemiology, including molecular markers of environmental exposures, applications to risk assessment, and genetic markers of susceptibility. Students will present key papers in the literature for discussion. Applications will cover cancer, cardiovascular disease, and infectious diseases.
Course Activities: Student presentations and written evaluations of key papers.
Course Note: Enrollment limited to 16 students; signature of instructor required.


EPI252 Infections and Cancer
Spring 2
Dr. N. Mueller, Dr. S. Stuver

2.50 credits
To be given 2002-2003; offered alternate years.
Lectures, seminars, case studies. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

This course reviews the epidemiology and public health impact of viral and other infectious agents associated with malignancy. The role of host response and the use of serology and viral probes as risk markers are discussed. A related disease or unknown agent is discussed as a case study.
Course Note: EPI 213 required.


EPI254 The Epidemiology of Aging
Spring 2
Dr. F. Grodstein

1.25 credits
Lectures. One 2-hour session each week.

This course will cover epidemiologic concepts and methods related to diseases of aging as well as general health issues in the elderly. Topics will include the epidemiology of Alzheimer's Disease; pharmacoepidemiology in the elderly; quality of life in aging populations; methodologic dilemmas in such research; as well as others.


EPI255 Epi of HIV,Part I:Etiology, Natural History & Transmission
Fall 2
Dr. G. Seage

2.5 credits
Lectures. One 3-hour session each week.

This course is designed to introduce students to the epidemiology of HIV infection. It is designed for those students with a keen interest in both HIV/AIDS and epidemiologic methods. This course will survey state-of-the-art knowledge of the epidemiology of HIV infection and will emphasize epidemiologic principles and methods; including studies of the
etiology of AIDS, estimation of the incidence and prevalence of HIV and AIDS, natural history and survival. The use of appropriate study designs and potential sources of bias will be discussed, with a focus on observational designs. This course will provide the student with experience in the critical review of epidemiologic studies in this area.
Course Activities: Homework assignments will consist of study questions or study critiques. These assignments constitute 100% of the grade and are due on the day of the discussions.
Course Note: EPI200, EPI201, or EPI208 required.


EPI256 Epi of HIV, Part II: Therapeutic & Prevention Interventions
WinterSession
Dr. G. Seage

2.5 credits
To be taught 2002-2003; offered alternate years.
Lectures. Three 3-hour sessions each week.

This course is designed to introduce students to the design and conduct of HIV therapeutic and prevention interventions. It is designed for those students with a keen interest in both HIV/AIDS and epidemiologic methods. This course will survey state-of-the-art knowledge of the epidemiology of HIV infection and will emphasize epidemiologic principles and methods including the design and conduct of ethical HIV intervention trials. The use of appropriate study designs and potential sources of bias will be discussed. This course will provide the student with experience in the development of a research proposal.
Course Activities: Grades will be based on a research proposal describing a therapeutic or prevention trial.
Course Note: EPI 200, EPI201, EPI208 or signature of instructor required. Enrollment in EPI255 strongly recommended.


EPI257 Advanced Seminar in Breast Cancer Epidemiology
Spring 2
Dr. G. Colditz, Dr. S. Hankinson

2.5 credits
Lectures, seminars. One 2-hour session each week.

This course is an advanced seminar in current breast cancer research. It is intended for graduate students who have passed their doctoral qualifying exam and who have a research focus in, or a strong interest in, cancer epidemiology and cancer prevention. Topics to be covered include mathematical models of breast carcinogenesis, associations between endogenous and exogenous hormones and breast cancer, histopathology of benign and malignant breast conditions, estrogen receptivity of tumors, breast morphology (mammographic density), mechanisms of chemoprevention and public health implications of such a strategy, lifestyle factors (diet and physical activity) and breast cancer, mammographic screening and risk communication. Meetings will be led by expert scientists in the research area, but the meetings are expected to be participatory discussions about future directions for research in the particular area.
Course Note: Enrollment limited; lab or section time to be announced at first meeting; pass/fail only.


EPI260 Mathematical Modeling of Infectious Diseases
Spring 2
Dr. M. Lipsitch

2.5 credits
Lectures, seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

This course will cover selected topics and techniques in the use of dynamical models to study the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases. Class sessions will primarily consist of lectures and demonstrations of modeling techniques, with some guest presentations by researcher in the field. Techniques will include design and construction of appropriate differential equation models, equilibrium and stability analysis, parameter estimation from epidemiological data, determination and interpretation of the basic reprodutive number of an infection, techniques for sensitivity analysis, and critique of model assumptions. Specific topics will include the use of age-seroprevalence data, the effects of population heterogeneity on transmission, stochastic models and the use of models for pathogens with multiple strains. This course is designed for students with a basic understanding of mathematical modeling concepts who want to develop models for their own work.
Course Note: Previous course in calculus is required; EPI225 or permission of instructor required.


EPI269 Epidemiological Research in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Spring
Dr. B. Harlow, Dr. D. Cramer, Dr. K. Michels

2.5 credits
Lectures. One 2-hour session each week.

This course will provide an overview of the methods and results from epidemiological research in the areas of contraception, infertility, pregnancy, menopause, and both benign and malignant gynecological conditions. Several lectures will feature an Ob/Gyn specialist who provides an overview of the clinical and physiological underpinnings of a particular topical area. These unique lectures compliment the discussion of pertinent epidemiological methods and topical literature.
Course Note: EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI 208 or signature of instructor required.


EPI270 Advanced Reproductive Epidemiology
Fall 1
Dr. B. Harlow

1.25 credits
Lectures, seminars. One 2-hour session each week.

This course is an advanced seminar in reproductive and reproductive cancer research. It is intended for graduate students who have a research focus, or a strong interest, in reproductive or reproductive cancer epidemiology. Topics to be covered include epidemiological issues surrounding obstetrical complications, infertility, menopause, benign and malignant gynecological conditions. Meetings will be led by Dr. Harlow with presentations by class participants on important landmark studies in the literature. Meetings are expected to be participatory discussions about the strengths and weaknesses of the literature discussed, and future directions for research in the particular area.
Course Note: Enrollment limited; section time to be announced at the first meeting; EPI269 or equivalent required; pass/fail grading option only.


EPI284 Epidemiology of Neurologic Diseases
Spring 1
Dr. A. Ascherio

2.5 credits
To be offered 2002-2003; offered alternate years.
Lectures, seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

This course is designed to introduce students to the epidemiology of major neurologic diseases. The emphasis will be both on research methods and on substantive issues. The course will stress etiologic and research intergrating epidemiology with clinical and pathological aspects. The following topics and diseases will be addressed: the epidemiologic approach to clinical neurology; public health implications of neurologic diseases; aging and neurologic diseases; co-morbidity and neurologic diseases; genetic epidemiologic approaches to neurologic diseases. Neurological diseases that will be discussed include stroke, cerebrovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease, dementia, Parkinson's disease, cancers of the nervous system and epilepsy.


EPI300 Independent Study/ Tutorial
Fall 1
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

An opportunity for independent study is offered for interested and qualified students or small groups of students. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and are limited by the amount of faculty time available. These programs are open to all students who wish to go beyond the content of the regular courses.
Course Note: Completed independent study contract is required at the time of registration; maximum of 5 credits per independent study topic; pass/fail only; signature of instructor required.


EPI300 Independent Study/ Tutorial
Fall
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

An opportunity for independent study is offered for interested and qualified students or small groups of students. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and are limited by the amount of faculty time available. These programs are open to all students who wish to go beyond the content of regular courses.
Course Note: Completed independent study contract is required at the time of registration; maximum of 5 credits per independent study topic; pass/ fail only; signature of instructor required.


EPI300 Independent Study/ Tutorial
Fall 2
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

An opportunity for independent study is offered for interested and qualified students or small groups of students. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and are limited by the amount of faculty time available. These programs are open to all students who wish to go beyond the content of regular courses.
Course Note: Completed independent study contract is required at the time of registration; maximum of 5 credits per independent study topic; pass/ fail only; signature of instructor required.


EPI300 Independent Study/ Tutorial
Spring 1
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

An opportunity for independent study is offered for interested and qualified students or small groups of students. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and are limited by the amount of faculty time available. These programs are open to all students who wish to go beyond the content of regular courses.
Course Note: Completed independent study contract is required at the time of registration; maximum of 5 credits per independent study topic; pass/ fail only; signature of instructor required.


EPI300 Independent Study/ Tutorial
Spring
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

An opportunity for independent study is offered for interested and qualified students or small groups of students. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and are limited by the amount of faculty time available. These programs are open to all students who wish to go beyond the content of regular courses.
Course Note: Completed independent study contract is required at the time of registration; maximum of 5 credits per independent study topic; pass/ fail only; signature of instructor required.


EPI300 Independent Study/ Tutorial
Spring 2
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

An opportunity for independent study is offered for interested and qualified students or small groups of students. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and are limited by the amount of faculty time available. These programs are open to all students who wish to go beyond the content of regular courses.
Course Note: Completed independent study contract is required at the time of registration; maximum of 5 credits per independent study topic; pass/ fail only; signature of instructor required.


EPI300 Independent Study/ Tutorial
WinterSession
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

An opportunity for independent study is offered for interested and qualified students or small groups of students. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and are limited by the amount of faculty time available. These programs are open to all students who wish to go beyond the content of regular courses.
Course Note: Completed independent study contract is required at the time of registration; maximum of 5 credits per independent study topic; pass/ fail only; signature of instructor required.


EPI310 Research in Clinical Epidemiology
Fall 1
Dr. E.F. Cook

Time and credit to be arranged.

All students working in the Concentration of Clinical Epidemiology, who intend to complete the requirements for a Master of Science in Epidemiology based on only a summer schedule, are required to undertake and complete a clinical research project at their institution. Ten tutorial credits will be granted for this research. Each student is required to submit a written paper summarizing his or her research project. The exact content of this research project is determined by the faculty member assigned as principal advisor to the student. An appropriate content for this project might include the development of a research proposal to address a clinical question of interest, the implementation of this proposal with the collection of patient data, the analysis of these data, and the creation of a publishable manuscript (with detailed appendices) to describe the results of the analysis. Alternatively, part of this project might pertain to the creation of a full-fledged RO1 study protocol in the National Institutes of Health format, a publishable paper based on the analysis of existing data, a decision analysis, or a cost-effectiveness analysis.
Course Activities: Supervised research. Written progress reports must be submitted each semester.
Course Note: Acceptance into the Program in Clinical Effectiveness and completion is required; pass/fail grading option only.


EPI311 Teaching Assistant
Fall 1
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.


EPI311 Teaching Assistant
Spring 2
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.


EPI311 Teaching Assistant
Spring
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.


EPI350 Research
Fall 1
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

For doctoral candidates who have passed their school-wide Oral Qualifying Examination and who are undertaking advanced work along the lines of fundamental or applied research in the department.
Course Note: Pass/Fail only; maximum of 20 credits; signature of instructor required.


EPI350 Research
Fall
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

For doctoral candidates who have passed their school-wide Oral Qualifying Examination and who are undertaking advanced work along the lines of fundamental or applied research in the department.
Course Note: Pass/fail only; maximum of 20 credits, signature of instructor required.


EPI350 Research
Fall 2
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

For doctoral candidates who have passed their school-wide Oral Qualifying Examination and who are undertaking advanced work along the lines of fundamental or applied research in the department.
Course Note: Pass/fail only; maximum of 20 credits, signature of instructor required.


EPI350 Research
Spring 1
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

For doctoral candidates who have passed their school-wide Oral Qualifying Examination and who are undertaking advanced work along the lines of fundamental or applied research in the department.
Course Note: Pass/fail only; maximum of 20 credits, signature of instructor required.


EPI350 Research
Spring
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

For doctoral candidates who have passed their school-wide Oral Qualifying Examination and who are undertaking advanced work along the lines of fundamental or applied research in the department.
Course Note: Pass/fail only; maximum of 20 credits, signature of instructor required.


EPI350 Research
Spring 2
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

For doctoral candidates who have passed their school-wide Oral Qualifying Examination and who are undertaking advanced work along the lines of fundamental or applied research in the department.
Course Note: Pass/fail only; maximum of 20 credits, signature of instructor required.


EPI350 Research
WinterSession
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

For doctoral candidates who have passed their school-wide Oral Qualifying Examination and who are undertaking advanced work along the lines of fundamental or applied research in the department.
Course Note: Pass/fail only; maximum of 20 credits, signature of instructor required.


EPI400 Non-Resident Research
Fall 1
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

For doctoral candidates who have passed their school-wide Oral Qualifying Examination and who are undertaking advanced work along the lines of fundamental or applied research in the department.
Course Note: Pass/Fail only; maximum of 20 credits; signature of instructor required.


EPI400 Non-Resident Research
Fall
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

For doctoral candidates who have passed their school-wide Oral Qualifying Examination and who are undertaking advanced work along the lines of fundamental or applied research in the department.
Course Note: Pass/fail only; maximum of 20 credits, signature of instructor required.


EPI400 Non-Resident Research
Fall 2
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

For doctoral candidates who have passed their school-wide Oral Qualifying Examination and who are undertaking advanced work along the lines of fundamental or applied research in the department.
Course Note: Pass/fail only; maximum of 20 credits, signature of instructor required.


EPI400 Non-Resident Research
Spring 1
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

For doctoral candidates who have passed their school-wide Oral Qualifying Examination and who are undertaking advanced work along the lines of fundamental or applied research in the department.
Course Note: Pass/fail only; maximum of 20 credits, signature of instructor required.


EPI400 Non-Resident Research
Spring
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

For doctoral candidates who have passed their school-wide Oral Qualifying Examination and who are undertaking advanced work along the lines of fundamental or applied research in the department.
Course Note: Pass/fail only; maximum of 20 credits, signature of instructor required.


EPI400 Non-Resident Research
Spring 2
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

For doctoral candidates who have passed their school-wide Oral Qualifying Examination and who are undertaking advanced work along the lines of fundamental or applied research in the department.
Course Note: Pass/fail only; maximum of 20 credits, signature of instructor required.


EPI400 Non-Resident Research
WinterSession
Department Members

Time and credit to be arranged.

For doctoral candidates who have passed their school-wide Oral Qualifying Examination and who are undertaking advanced work along the lines of fundamental or applied research in the department.
Course Note: Pass/fail only; maximum of 20 credits, signature of instructor required.


ID206 Scientific Writing in Nutrition and Epidemiology
Spring
Dr. M. Stampfer

2.5 credits
Seminars. One 2-hour session each week.

This course is designed to improve writing skills for nutrition/epidemiology researchers. The course will cover such areas as organization of scientific papers, presentation of data in graphical and tabular forms, and style. The course is designed for advanced students who are beginning to work on a paper for publication.
Course Activities: After two initial meetings in the Spring I period to discuss principles of scientific writing, show specific examples, and suggest readings, students will work on their papers independently, under the overall supervision of their own faculty advisors. In the Spring II period, class sessions will be scheduled weekly. Each student will be assigned one primary and one secondary reviewer who will critique the paper in detail and lead the class discussion of the individual student's paper. The instructor will guide the discussion and use the paper to make additional points of constructive criticism, which will serve to illustrate the principles enunciated at the beginning of the class.
Course Note: Enrollment limited to 8 students; signature of instructor required.


ID213 Nutrition and Heart Disease
Fall 2
Dr. F. Sacks, Dr. E. Rimm

1.25 Credits
Lectures. One 2-hour session each week.

Contemporary topics on fatty acids, types of carbohydrate, fiber, gene-diet interactions, alcohol vitamins, minerals, homocysteine, and anti-oxidants and their involvement in coronary heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes.
Course Note: Minimum of 10 students required.


ID214 Nutritional Epidemiology
Spring
Department of Nutrition and the Department of Epidemiology

Dr. W. Willett, Dr. F. Hu
2.5 credits
Lectures. One 2-hour session each week.

Reviews methods for assessing the dietary intake of populations and individuals. Students gain experience in the actual collection, analysis and interpretation of dietary intake. The course also reviews several specific diet/disease relationships, integrating information from international studies, secular trends, clinical trials, analytical epidemiology, and animal experiments.
Course Note: BIO 200, BIO 201 or BIO 200s and BIO 200t, and EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI 208 required; familiarity with regression/ANOVA recommended; signature of instructor required for students who have not taken a course in nutrition.


ID215 Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology
Spring
Department of Environmental Health and the Department of Epidemiology

Dr. R. Hauser, Dr. D. Dockery
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. One 2-hour session each week.

This course has three objectives: to review methods used in evaluating the health effects of physical and chemical agents in the environment, to review available evidence on the health effects of such exposures, and to consider policy questions raised by the scientific evidence. Topics include lectures on methodology, seminars on the review and criticism of current literature, and presentations by outside experts on specific environmental and occupational health issues of current interest.
Course Note: EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI 208 and BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 206, BIO 219 or BIO 200s and BIO 200t required.


ID215 Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology
Summer 2
Department of Environmental Health and the Department of Epidemiology

Dr. R. Hauser, Dr. D. Dockery
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. Five 2-hour sessions each week.

This course has three objectives: to review methods used in evaluating the health effects of physical and chemical agents in the environment, to review available evidence on the health effects of such exposures, and to consider policy questions raised by the scientific evidence. Topics include lectures on methodology, seminars on the review and criticism of current literature, and presentations by outside experts on specific environmental and occupational health issues of current interest.
Course Note: EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI 208required; BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 206, BIO 219 or BIO 200s and BIO 200t required (concurrent enrollment permitted). Course not offered 2002-03.


ID221 Nutritional Epidemiology II
Fall
Department of Nutrition and the Department of Epidemiology

Dr. A. Ascherio, Department Members
2.5 credits
Not to be given 2002-2003; offered alternate years.
Lectures, case studies. One two-hour session each week.

This course addresses methodological aspects of research in nutritional epidemiology. Topics include validation studies, adjustment for energy intake, and correction of measurement error. Theoretical as well as practical aspects will be covered. This course is intended primarily for students interested in doing epidemiologic research.
Course Activities: Review of original articles, data analyses, computer simulations.
Course Note: BIO 210 or equivalent required; ID214 required; signature of instructor required indicating suitable background.


ID228 Principles of Screening
Spring 2
Dr. Zhang

2.5 credits
Lectures, seminars, case studies. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

The aim of this course is to provide a basic understanding of the principles of disease screening. Particular emphasis is placed on screening from a public health perspective. The first part of the course will focus on the quantitative foundations underlying screening evaluation. We will review current approaches to screening for cancer, as well as applications in a number of other settings. Controversies and limitations of screening strategies will be discussed.
Course Activities: Class participation in seminars and formal debates, one problem set, and final 5-10 page paper.


ID233 Research Synthesis & Meta-Analysis in Public Health and Medicine
Spring 2
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology

Dr. S. Liu
2.5 credits
Seminars. One 3-hour session each week.

Concerned with the use of existing data to inform clinical decision making and health care policy, the course focuses on research synthesis (meta-analysis). The principles of meta-analytic statistical methods are reviewed, and the application of these to data sets is explored. Application of methods includes considerations for clinical trials and observational studies. The use of meta-analysis to explore data and identify sources of variation among studies is emphasized, as is the use of meta-analysis to identify future research questions.
Course Activities: Students prepare a protocol to conduct a meta-analysis and use existing meta-analysis software to apply principles outlined in the course to data sets provided for this purpose.
Course Note: No auditors.


ID233 Research Synthesis & Meta-Analysis in Public Health and Medicine
Summer 2
Dr. M. Stoto

2.5 credits
Lectures. Five 2-hour sessions each week.

Concerned with the use of existing data to inform clinical decision making and health care policy, the course focuses on research synthesis (meta-analysis). The principles of meta-analytic statistical methods are reviewed, and the application of these to data sets is explored. Application of methods includes considerations for clinical trials and observational studies. The use of meta-analysis to explore data and identify sources of variation among studies is emphasized, as is the use of meta-analysis to identify future research questions.
Course Activities: Students prepare a protocol to conduct a meta-analysis and use existing meta-analysis software to apply principles outlined in the course to data sets provided for this purpose.


ID236 Social Epidemiology
Spring 1
Departments of Health and Social Behavior and the Department of Epidemiology

Dr. L. Berkman
2.5 credits
Lectures, seminars. One 3-hour session each week.

The course will focus on understanding the social determinants of health. Readings and discussion center on understanding the theories, measurement and empirical evidence related to specific social conditions and experiences such as socioeconomic position, discrimination, social networks and support, work conditions, ecological level neighborhood and community social conditions, and social and economic policies. Biological and psychological mechanisms by which social conditions influence health will be discussed. The course builds on a basic understanding of society and health and of epidemiology. Students will be required to present in class and evaluate methods and measures.
Course Activities: Assigned readings; class presentations and discussions; term paper.
Course Note: Enrollment limited to 20 students; HSB 201, EPI 200 (or EPI 201), EPI 202 and HSB 215 required; no auditors.


ID253 Information Management in Epidemiology
Spring 1
Department of Epidemiology and the Department of Biostatistics

Dr. K. A. Chan, Dr. M. Testa
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies, computer exercises. Two 1.5-hour sessions each week. One 1-hour lab each week.

This course is designed to introduce students to the theory and applications of information technology that are used in modern epidemiology. Pertinent concepts of relational database theory and structured query language will be described, followed by lectures on data forms design, database construction, and data validation for studies that involve ad hoc collection of primary data. Record linkage techniques for utilization of secondary data in epidemiology will be introduced. Existing data sources, such as Medicaid, automated insurance claims systems, and computerized medical records will be described. Students will have hands-on experience working with computer programs in the lab sessions. Examples will be drawn from studies in pharmacoepidemiology, clinical epidemiology, and intervention studies.
Course Note: EPI200, EPI201, or EPI208, and BIO200 or BIO201 required; for students not familiar with the latest computer technology; lab section to be announced at first meeting.


ID267 Infectious Disease Epidemiology Seminar I
Fall
Department of Epidemiology and Department of Immunology and Infectious Disease

Dr. M. Lipsitch, Dr. M. Murray
2.5 credits
Seminars. One 2-hour seminar each week.

Seminars consist of presentations of student and faculty research in progress and discussion of recent publications in the field of infectious disease epidemiology. The emphasis is on conceptual issues related to the epidemiology of infectious diseases.
Course Activities: Individual student papers and presentations, student and faculty critiques.
Course Note: Must be taken for credit by students in the Program on the Epidemiology of Infectious Disease. Signature of instructor required. This course in intended for doctoral students currently involved in thesis work and for others with active research projects.


ID269 Respiratory Epidemiology
Fall 2
Department of Environmental Health and the Department of Epidemiology

Dr. D. Dockery
1.25 credits
Not to be given 2002-2003; offered alternate years.
Lectures, case studies. One 2-hour session each week.

Reviews the epidemiology of respiratory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, respiratory cancer, and infectious respiratory disease. Demographic distribution, time trends and risk factors of these diseases are discussed.
Course Note: EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI 208 required.


ID271 Advanced Regression for Environmental Epidemiology
Spring 1
Departments of Environmental Health, Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Dr. J. Schwartz, Dr. W. Huang
2.5 credits
Lectures and seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

The course will cover nonlinear exposure-response relationships and repeated measure designs, including non-parametric and semi-parametric smoothing techniques, generalized additive models, robust regression and time series models. In addition to the theoretical material, students will apply these techniques using S-plus and SAS to actual datasets including modeling the effects of environmental exposures on health outcomes. These techniques also are widely applicable to problems in infectious disease, psychiatric, nutritional, occupational, and cancer epidemiology.
Course Activities: Lectures and structured workshops in the instructional computer facility.
Course Note: EPI 200, EPI 201 or EPI 208, and BIO 233 or BIO 211required; EPI 202 and EPI 204 are strongly recommended; minimum enrollment of 3 students required; signature of instructor required; lab or section time to be announced at first meeting. COURSE IS NOT OFFERED 2002-03. Next offered Spring 2004.


ID274 Oral Health Policy Research Seminar
Fall/Spring
Cross-listed at HDS as OHPE-222

Department of Epidemiology and the Department of Health Policy and Management
Dr. C. Douglass, Dr. K. Joshpipura
2.5 credits, given at end of last semester
Lectures, seminars. One 1-hour session each week.

The fall term concentrates on the research methods and current major studies of the epidemiology of oral and dental diseases, and the need, supply, demand, and cost of dental care. Policy documents of the NCHS, NIH, ADA, IOM, and ADEA are studied. Research designs and data collection methods of health policy and epidemiology studies are reviewed. The spring term emphasizes the research work of faculty and students on relevant oral epidemiology and dental care policy subjects. Grade is based upon participation and the defense of a current epidemiology or policy analysis proposal or research project.


ID277 Modern Genetic Epidemiology and Gene Mapping
Fall 1
Department of Environmental Health and Department of Epidemiology

Dr. X. Xu, Dr. T. Niu
2.5 credits
To be given 2002-2003; offered alternate years.
Lectures, seminars. One 2-hour session each week.

This multidisciplinary course is designed to provide a state-of-the-art guide to the emerging fields of modern genetic epidemiology and gene mapping in complex disorders. The completion of the Human Genome Project by 2003 will bring paradigmatic shifts of future human genetic epidemiologic studies. This course provides a comprehensive overview of the background of epidemiologic studies, epidemiologic methods and study designs, family and sib pair ascertainment, gene mapping technologies, computer software, data analysis, and interpretation. It will also explore a number of innovative new approaches for mapping genes of complex human diseases. In addition, the course will address the issues of genetic susceptibility, gene-gene interactions, and gene-environment interactions underlying common human diseases.
Course Activities: Preparatory readings required for each lecture. Grades will be based on homework assignments, a quiz, and class participation.
Course Note: EPI 201 and BIO 211, BIO 200, BIO 201 or BIO 200s and BIO 200t required; enrollment limited to 20 students; signature of instructor required.


ID278 Mental Health of Childrn and Adolescents
Spring 1
Department of Maternal and Child Health and Department of Epidemiology

Dr. S. Buka, Dr. B. Molnar, Dr. D. Kindlon
2.5 credits
Lectures, seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

Describes methods of studying the prevalence, risk factors, and prevention of major mental disorders that begin during childhood and adolescence, including mood disorders, conduct disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, learning disorders, substance abuse, youth suicide and others. Emphasis will be on methodological issues of case definition, research instruments for screening and diagnosis, and current epidemiological evidence. Students will gain a working knowledge of studying the epidemiology of mental disorders of childhood and adolescence as well as prevention strategies.


ID283 Epi Investigation of Soc & Env. Risks for Psychiatric Disorders
Spring 2
Dr. S. Buka, Dr. J Murphy, Dr. L Berkman, Dr. S. Gilman

2.5 Credits
Lectures, seminars, case studies. Two 2-hour sessions each week

Reviews the major social and environmental risks for psychiatric disorders of children, youth, and adults. Lectures will address current theories of social risks for and prevention of psychiatric illness, and the mechanisms linking social risks with psychiatric disorders across settings and over the life course. Topics include prenatal complications, childhood trauma, social networks, culture, social class, and community influences. Major epidemiologic studies of these topics are presented. Students will have the opportunity to design and conduct an original investigation of a social risk factor for psychiatric illness through a secondary data analysis of several psychiatric community studies. This course is in the psychiatric epidemiology track.
Course Note: No auditors.



ID286 Implementing Prevention
Summer 2
Department of Epidemiology and Department of Health and Social Behavior

Dr. G. Colditz, Dr. K. Emmons
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. Five 2-hour sessions each week.

This course will cover issues ranging from the evidence underlying prevention recommendations to theory and practice of implementing prevention. First, we will examine the sources of evidence and how they are sythesized to inform recommendations for prevention. This will include a brief review of methods for research synthesis and the classification scheme used by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Strategies for prevention that address population-wide change in risk will be considered including action by health care providers, regulatory change, and individual and community changes. The theories underlying behavior change will be reviewed and examples of ongoing prevention interventions will be discussed. Risk assessment and risk communication will be addressed and examples from cancer and cardiovascular disease will be used for class assignments. Finally, students will review a prevention strategy of their own choice and outline a plan for action.
Course Note: Ordinal grading only.


WGH200 Women, Gender and Health
Spring 1
Departments of Health and Social Behavior, Population and International Health, Maternal and Child Health and Epidemiology

Dr. N. Krieger, Dr. S. Gruskin
2.5 credits
Seminars. One 3-hour session each week.

This course will focus on constructions of gender and sex and their implications for understanding determinants of population health and creating healthy public policy. It will consider how different frameworks of addressing gender and biological sex shape questions asked and explanations and interventions offered for societal patterns of health, disease, and well-being. The course will demonstrate ways of conceptualizing gender in relation to biology and health using case examples pertaining to breast cancer, smoking, cumulative trauma disorders of hands and wrists, HIV/AIDS, violence, access to health services, sexual health, reproductive health, and population policy. In all these cases, issues of gender will be related to other social determinants of health, including social class, racism, and other forms of inequality. Implications of diverse approaches will be debated, as part of developing useful strategies for improving physical, mental, and social well-being of women and men.
Course Note: Enrollment limited to 25 students; signature of instructor required; no auditors. Students will be placed on a waiting list until the registration list is finalized by the instructors.


WGH207 Advanced Topics in Women, Gender and Health
Spring 2
Department of Maternal and Child Health, Department of Health and Social Behavior, Department of Population and International Health and Department of Epidemiology

Dr. L. McCloskey
1.25 credits
Seminars. One 2-hour sessions each week.

This interdepartmental, interdisciplinary seminar will offer the chance to analyze ways by which diverse constructs of gender influence public health research and practice. Using different examples each week, the core WGH faculty and students will focus on how gender contributes to classifying, surveying, understanding and intervening on population distributions of health, disease, and well-being. Discussion of these examples will draw on different disciplines, conceptual frameworks, and methodological approaches (both quantitative and qualitative). For example, traditional epidemiological and biostatistical methods, along with multilevel, ecosocial, and health and human rights frameworks will be applied, as appropriate, in the assessment of gender-based health related disorders. The format will include formal presentations and informal discussions.
Course Note: Minimum enrollment of 5; maximum enrollment of 20; instructor's signature required. Pass/fail only.





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