Press Releases

2003 Releases

Nutrition Source Web Site Offers the Latest News and Research on Diet and Health from Trusted Authority

For immediate release:  January 02, 2003

Boston, MA— The Department of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health has created a comprehensive web site designed to inform and educate the public, journalists and nutrition professionals about the latest news and issues surrounding diet and health. Visit the Nutrition Source at www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource

Nutrition Source gathers the latest news on health and diet compiled by the nationally renowned faculty from the Department of Nutrition at HSPH. The site features Department Chair Walter Willett’s groundbreaking research on building a new food guide pyramid to replace the existing USDA pyramid, a question and answer page where Willett discusses his book, "Eat Drink and Be Healthy," Associate Professor Frank Hu’s research on diet, lifestyle and risk of type 2 diabetes, and much more. "Making healthy dietary choices is one of the most important ways an individual can influence their long-term well-being," said Willett. "The Nutrition Source aims to provide visitors with the best available scientific evidence to inform their decision."

Visitors to the site will find the latest press releases on recently published faculty research, links to archived webcasts, nutrition items in the news and reports from professional journals on key nutrition findings.

The site features links to specific pages on:

  • Food pyramids
  • Fats and cholesterol
  • Carbohydrates
  • Protein
  • Fiber
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Calcium and milk
  • Vitamins
  • Healthy weight

Each page also contains tips on where to find more information on the subject at hand.

"The public is very interested in nutrition, however, confusion can arise from the volume and varying quality of nutrition information," said Lilian Cheung, Department of Nutrition faculty member and editorial director of the Nutrition Source site. "We developed Nutrition Source for journalists, to provide them with the latest scientific background on various nutrition and food topics, for health professionals including doctors and nurse practitioners–important gatekeepers of nutrition advice–and for consumers, to provide sound, reliable and practical information."

The contents of the Nutrition Source web site are not intended to offer personal medical advice, which should be obtained from a healthcare provider. The information on the site does not mention brand names or endorse products, and the web site receives no funding from outside institutions.

For further information, please contact:

Robin Herman
Office of Communications
Harvard School of Public Health
677 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
Phone: 617-432-4752
Email: rherman@hsph.harvard.edu

,

Boston, MA— The Department of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health has created a comprehensive web site designed to inform and educate the public, journalists and nutrition professionals about the latest news and issues surrounding diet and health. Visit the Nutrition Source at www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource

Nutrition Source gathers the latest news on health and diet compiled by the nationally renowned faculty from the Department of Nutrition at HSPH. The site features Department Chair Walter Willett’s groundbreaking research on building a new food guide pyramid to replace the existing USDA pyramid, a question and answer page where Willett discusses his book, "Eat Drink and Be Healthy," Associate Professor Frank Hu’s research on diet, lifestyle and risk of type 2 diabetes, and much more. "Making healthy dietary choices is one of the most important ways an individual can influence their long-term well-being," said Willett. "The Nutrition Source aims to provide visitors with the best available scientific evidence to inform their decision."

Visitors to the site will find the latest press releases on recently published faculty research, links to archived webcasts, nutrition items in the news and reports from professional journals on key nutrition findings.

The site features links to specific pages on:

  • Food pyramids
  • Fats and cholesterol
  • Carbohydrates
  • Protein
  • Fiber
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Calcium and milk
  • Vitamins
  • Healthy weight

Each page also contains tips on where to find more information on the subject at hand.

"The public is very interested in nutrition, however, confusion can arise from the volume and varying quality of nutrition information," said Lilian Cheung, Department of Nutrition faculty member and editorial director of the Nutrition Source site. "We developed Nutrition Source for journalists, to provide them with the latest scientific background on various nutrition and food topics, for health professionals including doctors and nurse practitioners–important gatekeepers of nutrition advice–and for consumers, to provide sound, reliable and practical information."

The contents of the Nutrition Source web site are not intended to offer personal medical advice, which should be obtained from a healthcare provider. The information on the site does not mention brand names or endorse products, and the web site receives no funding from outside institutions.

For further information, please contact:

Robin Herman
Office of Communications
Harvard School of Public Health
677 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
Phone: 617-432-4752
Email: rherman@hsph.harvard.edu